Posts in art

June 15th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music), Events/Happenings, Participate!

Temple of Transition: It’s Big and It’s Happening

This is Chris “Kiwi” Hankins, leader of the 2011 Temple crew, with a scale model of the Temple of Transition. Those of you who visited the Megatropolis installation in 2010 will recognize its colorful silhouette, which should give you a point of reference. Yes, that’s to scale.

Another point of reference: three times the height of Marco Cochrane's "Bliss Dance".

This year, a largely international Temple crew will construct a circle of six structures: five 58-foot-high outer temples, and a 120-foot-high inner temple. The temples will be connected with 60-foot-long walkways. The entire installation will have a diameter of 200 feet, and will be taller than the Man.

To build something on this scale, as Burners well know, you need an impassioned leader. Enter Kiwi, an experienced builder who’s been constructing the Man at Kiwiburn (New Zealand’s regional burn) for several years, and who has also lent a hand to build Black Rock City as part of the Department of Public Works.

Kiwi’s latest achievement is Megatropolis, which he and the International Arts Megacrew built last year.

“Before we were even finished building Megatropolis, I was already thinking ‘what are we gonna build next?’” Kiwi says. Later, as Megatropolis burned, a friend turned to him and asked, “What do you think?”

“I think I want to do the Temple,” Kiwi replied.

Read more »

May 24th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music)

Flying Solo – Laura Kimpton

 

Flying Solo Exhibit
Featuring Laura Kimpton
Opening Reception
McLaughlin Gallery 49 Geary (corner Grant). Suite 200
San Francisco
Thursday, June 2, 2011
5:30pm to 8:30pm

View new works of collage, assemblage, and sculpture by Laura Kimpton.

Works on exhibition from June 2nd to July 30th, 2011. This solo exhibition of 2D and 3D recycled mixed media creations draws upon Laura’s spiritual connection to birds and her own need to tear down societal constraints that keep us from discovering and celebrating our inner core.

Register For This Event http://www.eventbrite.com/event/1636854877

AFTER PARTY at the Hotel Monaco 9 pm – 2 am. Come celebrate the completion of this Solo Show.

Marin based Laura Kimpton is known for her daring and thought-provoking work; including “Celtic Forest,” a sculpture and fire site at [BM].

May 18th, 2011  |  Filed under News

Crowdsourcing: Anatomy of a Kickstarter

In the past two years, we saw a pretty big spike in the number of requests from artists and project collaborators requesting a voice for fundraising efforts on their Burning Man creations. Historically, all sorts of artists have done community fundraising in all sorts of ways, and we’ve shared them on various information channels from time to time, so these requests themselves are nothing new. But the smaller-world phenomenon of the internet has increased the visibility for these efforts and the creative ways that Burning Man artists, theme campers, Mutant Vehicle creators, even filmmakers and painters have been able to reach out to their communities for help to make playa projects possible.

The individual artists and collectives behind these projects keep returning with increasingly creative ways to invite and welcome contributions from other BRC citizens — reaching all of you potential art patrons who know or just admire the work of these creatives already. You’ve told us that you are happy to take part in helping to bring each year’s Temple, zoetrope, or garbage-burning 80 foot mechabolic slug to life in Black Rock City, so while we’re careful not to overload, we have continued to share these messages.

Thing is, citizens have donated to the arts in BRC for years, but time has increased the throw of their intentions. Nothing can change the bare-bones reality of fundraising for creative projects. One look at the art  of Burning Man shows that some ideas are bigger than one person’s vision, but the size of the budget isn’t really the point, for large and small projects alike have continued approaching us for visibility. How to be egalitarian about sharing these requests with the crowd when we’ve shared a thousand other “calls for help” and fundraiser event requests over the years, and when community support is such an ingrained part of our art culture? Read more »

May 4th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music), Events/Happenings

ArtPadSF: A Private Preview and Benefit for the Black Rock Arts Foundation

Private Preview: A Benefit for the The Black Rock Arts Foundation

May 18, 2011
7:00 pm – Midnight
The Phoenix Hotel
601 Eddy St., San Francisco

Celebrate the extraordinary contemporary artists and galleries that enrich the Bay Area and beyond, and enjoy an exclusive evening of performances, live music, the Premiere Lounge, and much more at this opening night party for ArtPadSF!

Join the producers, galleries, and artists of the first annual ArtPadSF at the legendary Phoenix Hotel for an exclusive evening of emerging contemporary art, commissioned performances, and liberal libations.

Proceeds from ArtPadSF’s Opening Night celebration will benefit The [braf]‘s public art and grant programs, focused on inspiring art, community and civic participation worldwide.

ArtPadSF Ticket Packages:

Premiere Lounge and Poolside Soiree
$125 online presale; $150 at the door
7:00 pm – Midnight

Includes an evening of featured and roaming performances, DJs, heavy passed hors d’oeuvres, and hosted bar and exclusive access to the lounge from 7:00 – 9:00 pm. Also includes passes to the weekend’s other ArtPad events!

Poolside Soiree Only
$50 online presale; $75 at the door
7:00 pm – Midnight

Includes an evening of featured and roaming performances, DJs, light passed hors d’oeuvres, and one complimentary cocktail beverage.

BUY TICKETS HERE

Don’t miss this hip, homegrown alternative to the mainstream art scene. Get the first look at Chambers Restaurant and Lounge, San Francisco’s newest dining and entertainment destination. Be the first to experience ArtPadSF and to interact with participating artists and galleries from around the nation in this intimate setting.

Bay Area artists set the stage for this exciting new event with site specific and multimedia performances, interactive art, live music and DJs with original scores and mixes created especially for the occasion.

Featuring Performances by:

* Infectious dance beats by DJ Jive (Heart Deco) and Smoove
* Wearable art and performances by Bad Unkl SistaMiranda Caroligne, and Daphne Ruff
* Site specific dance performance by Capacitor
* A rather unconventional operatic performance by soprano Diva Marisa Lenhardt
* A processional performance by Loyd Family Players, mixing street theater, samba, hip-hop, funk, heavy metal, dancehall & reggae.
* Debut work by local composer and musician, EO
* San Francisco’s live electric cello + vocal looping mavericks, LOOP!STATION (loopthis.com)

ArtPadSF is a provocative, new, 21st century boutique art fair that focuses on emerging and contemporary art from the Bay Area and beyond. ArtPad SF invites San Francisco’s world-renowned museums, galleries, arts institutions, and artists to transform the newly renovated Phoenix Hotel into an alternative venue for art.

May 1st, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music)

Market Street Blooms Opening Reception

The Black Rock Arts Foundation has been working on many new partnerships and projects and we want you to help us celebrate them!  After all, it’s our community that makes it all possible.

The Black Rock Arts Foundation is honored to be part of the effort to revitalize the Central Market area in San Francisco in collaboration with the San Francisco Arts Commission, and we love sharing and supporting  Karen Cusolito’s sculptures.

photo: Mark Hammon

Central Market will come alive for the Art in Storefronts launch celebration!  The festivities include receptions at three neighborhood galleries, the debut of two temporary public art sculptures by Karen Cusolito, live music lining Central Market, and Off the Grid food trucks. The community celebration will kick off with the unveiling of six storefront installations and five murals designed by San Francisco artists.

Join the Black Rock Arts Foundation and the San Francisco Arts Commission for this FREE Market Street Blooms Opening Recption.

Music, speeches and mural unveiling:

May 13,  5:00 pm
998 Market St. San Francisco

Read more »

February 28th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music)

I Just Wanted to Say

In the spirit of Andie and Halcyon’s recent posts on sharing the concept of cultivation of “playa-spirit” year-round, I wanted to share the project, “I Just Wanted To Say,” a simple and engaging project that explores creating friendlier cities through the reprogramming of public transport and public seating space.

"I Just Wanted to Say" Artist Yen Trinh

This project was developed by self proclaimed, urbanist and designer, Yen Trinh, of Brisbane, Australia, with graphic design support from Steven Rhodes, also from Brisbane. It was developed in conjunction with PLATFORM, a project devised by the Public Art Unit, Project Services. It was curated by the Museum of Brisbane and the Brisbane City Council and received financial support through art+place, the Queensland Government’s Public Art Fund.

Concept mock-up of Yen Trinh's work, with graphic design support from Steven Rhodes

Design is too often seen as a superfluous and elitist preoccupation. In this project, however, Yen moves beyond the realm of logos, posters and objects and uses design as opportunity and agent for change. This project re-imagines design concepts typically found in public transport signs as an opportunity for interaction and conversation. Namely, it takes the idea of “priority seating” and adds a unique twist.

Easily accessible seats on public transport are universal. They have traditionally been designated for elderly and disabled based on both a culture of courtesy and handicap access legislation. This project uses similar visual design to create “priority seating for people who want conversation,” helping to cultivate “a culture of friendliness.”

Excerpt from the Signage:
Conversations in public spaces present endless possibilities to build connections, create community, and just make someone’s day a bit more interesting.

What makes this project interesting — and relevant to the cultivation of Black Rock City spirit — is its call for participation: anyone can download the design and make their own priority seating for conversation.

The work is currently on view in Brisbane at the RBH Busway Station until March 2011. An adapted version was seen at the Williamburg Walks in New York last June. Where else will it be on display? Well, that is most certainly up to you.  Do you know a place that could be transformed into priority seating for conversion? I just bet you do. As the project designers say: Friendliness is contagious. Pass it on.

Download priority seating signs here.

February 19th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music), Tales From The Playa

Syzygryd

Tales From The Playa are dreams and memories of events that took place at Burning Man, as told by its participants.

God knows how we found it, but isn’t that how all these stories start? We were wandering out near the Man on a clear night, the carnival was in full swing, and little loops of music bounced around from all directions. For a few minutes, we stood transfixed as a spinning steel globe cast white sparks of light in a whirling circle, projected on the dust.

Then, as if the Earth beneath us had simply switched one sculpture for another, we stood before a gyrating spire of boldly-colored lightbulbs, seemingly capable of casting any hue, creating the illusion of sending each wave of color up into the sky. People laid on their backs all the way around the base of the spire, their heads touching, their eyes breathing in the vivid display, their dusty boots splayed out around them.

The Earth moved again, and we began to hear some music.

Some rights reserved by mr. nightshade

Three glowing panels were arranged in a triangle around a twisted structure, which pulsed with sound and light and hissed with flammable gases. The beats and bleeps and bloops bumped in time with a sequence on the screens.

Someone danced animatedly at the panel closest to us, fiddling with the touchscreen grid and adding new, subtle elements to the song. Before too long, without me even having to scream “OH MY GOOD GOD, LET ME PLAY WITH IT!”, this Burner stepped aside, and the panel was mine. Read more »

February 11th, 2011  |  Filed under Culture (Art & Music), Technology

The Future of Art in Networked Times

Fountain is a 1917 work by Marcel Duchamp

Last week many of us turned in art proposals in hopes of financial support for our little, or in some cases huge, artistic desert visions. The value and beauty of many of these projects is not only their eventual physical manifestation; the highly collaborative nature of their conception and construction is equally important.

Historically, in the early parts of the twentieth century, collectives and collaborative art production were a feature of Dadaism, Surrealism and Constructivism. This spirit of collective art production was then revived in the 60s by the Fluxus, Conceptual, community-based, and feminist art movements.

‘The greatest legacy of the 1960s is the community based arts’ – Lucy Lippard

Turning to our current world of desert art making, how is this collaborative nature changing the current language/dialogue of art? And how is it doing so using the many web networking tools we have at our disposal? With the importance of the art making moving from ‘appearance’ to ‘conception’ and now to ‘society’  how is Burning Man participating in fundamentally changing values within art?

The Berlin-based KS12 collective is asking some similar questions about the fundamental nature of art in highly networked times in their “The Future of Art” – an immediated autodocumentary.  The film was shot, edited and shown at the Transmediale festival last week and supplemented by realtime photos from Flickr, videos from Vimeo, and questions via Quora. It was open to for anyone to submit to the process of production. The very tools of these highly networked times shaped the film; it was a production-as-process work.

The Future of Art from KS12 on Vimeo.

The questions they were investigating are very relevant to the Burning Man art making process:

What are the defining aesthetics of art in the networked era? How is mass collaboration changing notions of ownership in art? How does micropatronage change the way artists produce and distribute artwork?

These are some of the very questions that one ponders when making work with collaborative groups such as the Flux Foundation and Flaming Lotus Girls. Last year we saw many examples of the importance of networking tools. We saw the power of social networking as it challenged Paypal, and Kickstarter revolutionized the fundraising process for countless creative projects, making the concept of ‘micropatronage’ not only tangible but accessible and essential to successful work.

In what other ways do you see this networked era change and challenge our ideas of art and art making?