Take Your First Stroll Through the 2015 BRC Art Installations

The list of 2015 Black Rock City Honorarium art installations — reflecting a total of $1.2 million in art grants awarded through Burning Man Arts — is now live, so you can go peruse the art-chitecture that will adorn our temporary city in just a few months’ time. Some popular playa favorites will be returning, and some new ones will be made. Here are some sights I saw on my first stroll through the list.

bismuth.e82417db3b054bd69102b408bceadf47The Bismuth Bivouac, “a playful pavilion celebrating the orthogonal geometries that exist in natural Bismuth crystals.” Have you ever looked at bismuth? It is 100% as gnarly as this installation.

Fire Tetris, because Fire Tetris.

The Life Cube Project, which is graciously returning to Black Rock City after its adventures beyond the playa this year.

heads_cathedral.63a1a645272446f08b99ecacbab91051If you’re looking for me, you will probably find me talking to the Lumiphonic Creature Choir between 2:27 a.m. and sunrise every night.

I’m sure every BRC regular is excited to enjoy R-Evolution, the third and final chapter of Marco Cochrane and Deja Solis’ feminine sculptural saga that began with Bliss Dance and Truth is Beauty.

And, of course, there’s the majestic Temple of Promise, which just launched its crowd-funding campaign and needs all our help to fill its essential spiritual role in our city.

 

Well, I’m ready to go. How ’bout you?

Corpus Christi BWB Beach Clean-Up Nets 8,000 Pounds of MOOP

Sound Stage at sunset (Photo by Jessica Richman)
Sound Stage at sunset (Photo by Jessica Richman)

“My burn name is Parsec,” Patrick Brown of Corpus Christi, Texas told me. “I am previously of Arcattack, still fart around with them but doing chemistry full time at the moment. Been doing BWB events since right after Katrina. Brought 300 pounds of meat to feed the town of Pearlington at the one-year anniversary of the Katrina effort.”

This is exactly the (gender-neutral) cowboy way Burners talk about their adventures, and it was music to my ears. But Parsec isn’t talking about the town-sized bacon party in the Black Rock Desert. He’s talking about disaster relief efforts with Burners Without Borders, which is increasingly part of the Burner job description these days. (more…)

The Temple of Promise

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For four years in a row, the temples of Black Rock City have been palatial, romantic, classical in design. Time’s up. Some members of the 2015 Temple crew worked on the enchantingly abstract, boundary-pushing Temple of Flux five years ago, and they have brought that same fluid, organic inspiration to this year’s design: the Temple of Promise.

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The Temple of Promise is a guide. It’s a calming hand, and it’s a listening ear. Nestled in its center is a grove of trees. It’s no tower or pyramid or other such shape dictated by logic alone. It is no less a temple for its lifelike forms. It is more.

Scattered amidst the flow of the Temple area, wooden sculptures shaped like stones form a soft boundary. The tapering spiral of the main structure provides shelter and quiet. The lobed spire at its opening will tower 97 feet high. The tail of the building curls into a circle around the open-air grove, a container well suited for gatherings. The trees will be bare at the beginning of the week, but participants will leave their messages on strips of white cloth, which they will hang from the trees like the leaves of a weeping willow.

templegrove

In addition to the 2010 Temple of Flux, team members have worked in the past with artist Dan Fox on some of the playa’s most imposing and impressive sculptures ever: the Trojan Horse in 2011, Anubis in 2012, and the Alien Siege Machine in 2014. Others have volunteered on past temples in 2007, 2008, 2011, and 2013. This practice and expertise will serve them well. But it is clear from the design of the Temple of Promise that this team brings with it another complementary power that cannot be learned, only listened to: intuition.

Want to get involved? The team is working on their website and volunteer intake process, but in the meantime, like their Facebook page to stay in the loop.

Morris Burner Hotel: A Short Documentary about Burners Transforming Reno

The Morris Hotel in Reno is nothing less than the first Burner hotel in the world. It’s more than 80 years old, and for much of that time, it was dark, dingy, and underutilized. But that all changed when Jungle Jim and his community of Burners got his hands on it.

Now the hotel’s 43 rooms are designed and decorated by artists, and the facility provides space for the practice of the many Burnerly Arts, not the least of which is helping the homeless. The Reno Gazette-Journal has posted an 11-minute documentary on the work they’re doing, which we present here for your viewing pleasure:

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Burners Without Borders Detroit: Homeless Backpack Project

Danielle-Kaltz-Burners-Without-Borders-Detroit-Homeless-Backpack-Project-Impact-Grant-2014-225x300The creative generosity of Burners Without Borders never ceases to amaze. One project in particular, run by the Detroit BWB chapter has gathered enough momentum that you should definitely know about it, in case it inspires you to help out the homeless in your community.

The Burners Without Borders Detroit: Homeless Backpack Project has given away over 1200 backpacks full of water, food, clothes, blankets, and hygiene products to the homeless people of Detroit since it was conceived by Danielle “Doxie” Kaltz in 2008. Their target for this year is to give between 400 and 500 more. It gets cold in Detroit. These people need lots of supplies to survive. This 100% volunteer organization, nearly 100 people strong, is making a major difference for them, making grantors like the Pollination Project into repeat customers.

“It started out of the back of my Jeep,” Doxie says. “In winter 2006/2007 I started to see homeless under the bridges on the highways in Detroit, and it made me realize I had too much stuff. Don’t we all. So I started to fill my car with blankets and food, then I would stop and take items to the people who I started to call the Highway Men. Brave or stupid I realize this, but it was a calling, and I had to do it.”

10846487_10204479782309056_4169549143634316576_n-300x168Then Doxie’s friend, Rosey, asked her family to donate supplies to the Backpack Project instead of giving her Christmas gifts that year, and that’s when Doxie says “the project leveled up.” Rosey had the idea to put the supplies into sturdy backpacks instead of paper or plastic bags. Now nearly 100 volunteers help fundraise, gather supplies, and distribute backpacks. Anew Life Prosthetics and Orthotics has donated office space to the project for storing the supplies and hosting the backpacking events. Best of all, now that other volunteers are helping out, Doxie can now spend more time getting the word out.

“I do have one request of everyone who helps pass out backpacks,” Doxie says, “and that is that they ask the name of the person they are engaging with and that they tell them their name. It is easy for us to ignore homeless as we busy ourselves with our phones or radios or just simply refuse to turn our heads. I hope to humanize the experience as everyone deserves to be acknowledged, and I really do think we can change humanity if we just say ‘hi’ to people, not just homeless, and mean it. Time to bust our bubbles and connect to others.”

You can follow along with Burners Without Borders Detroit on their website or on Facebook.

Photos courtesy of the Pollination Project

Midburn 2015: Seeking Transcendence at the Israel Regional Burn

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This spring, in a desert halfway around the world from Black Rock, another Man will burn. The second Midburn, the official Israel regional event, is May 20–24, 2015. The theme is Transcendence. There is now a beacon of Burning Man culture in the Middle East, and may it be a force for peace.

Ha’ish (the Man) burns on the night of Shavuot. It’s the holiday of the gathering at Mount Sinai, the giving of the Ten Commandments to Moses, the bonding together of a holy community through an earth-shaking mass revelation in the desert. This Biblical event underlies all the faiths — Islam, Christianity and Judaism alike — that call these flowering deserts the Holy Land. People of all those faiths — and plenty of people from non-faiths — Israelis, Palestinians, and international travelers will share the burn that night. (more…)

Crimson Rose’s Interactive Art Panel at the International Sculpture Center Conference

Burning Man founder Crimson Rose continues her tour of urban art conferences, this time appearing on a panel at the International Sculpture Center Conference in New Orleans. Here’s what she had to say about her visit:

1743654_10153417647764056_6112845274064115113_nI saw that the theme for this years ISC’s Conference, now in its 24th year was Sculpture, Culture & Community. I knew that Burning Man needed to be involved and successfully applied for a panel called “Ignite the Art Spirit through Interactive Community Collaboration:”

“Interactive Community Collaboration is the context for creativity that blurs the distinction between audience and art form. People are transformed from spectator to participant and are given permission to become active contributors to a creative process. Gifting the experience of interactive art to a community is a way that is inclusive rather than exclusive, that permits spontaneous and immediate opportunities to interact with the art and to create ritual around such engagement.”

I was joined on the panel by David Best, the great sculptor who created the Temple at Burning Man, Sean Orlando from Five Tone Crane Arts Group, and Delaney Martin of New Orleans Airlift. We discussed the ideal vessel or receptacle for allowing interactive collaboration to flourish — be it Black Rock City or a public square in New Orleans — as well as the art of setting your art on fire, a practice of impermanence that’s far from the norm in the art world.

While in New Orleans, we also had an opportunity to take a tour of the Public Art of the City, which I truly enjoyed.

The Bay Lights Will Blink On as a Permanent Installation

Image courtesy of thebaylights.org

The Bay Lights, which first started sparkling across the Bay Bridge in March 2013, just hit its funding goal and will now be a permanent installation. The 1.8 mile-wide, 500-foot-high LED sculpture is the world’s largest, made of 25,000 white LEDs whose patterns glow from sundown to sunrise and never repeat. It will stay lit until 2026 at least.

In an email to supporters, Ben Davis, founder and CEO of Illuminate the Arts and big-time Burner, says that the $2 million raised so far was matched by philanthropist Tad Taube, bringing the organization to the $4 million baseline goal.

The Bay Lights installation is the brainchild of Leo Villareal, a world-renowned artist with many equally dazzling installations under his belt. He’s also one of the founders of Disorient, which is a Burning Man camp that, even if you haven’t heard of it, you’ve definitely heard. You know the blinky orange-y camp on the 3-o’-clock side of the Esplanade? Used to rock a giant orange traffic cone-looking thing? Yeah, them. Leo joined the inaugural Burning Man Board of Directors in 2011, and he re-upped after his initial term ended, continuing to serve on the Board today.

Villareal has been coming to Black Rock City since 1994, and he brought his first blinky installation in 1997 to solve a clear, simple problem: he had trouble finding his camp at night. That drove him to build his first large-scale piece in New York in 2003, and it just got more ambitious and beautiful from there. As a Burning Man veteran, Villareal is surely used to having to take apart his art and pack it up, but now he’s built the largest LED sculpture in the world, and the people have raised the money to keep it lit.

The piece has to be taken down for bridge maintenance next year, but the New York Times arts blog reports that the piece will be up again by January 2016.

Thank you to everyone who donated to keep this beautiful piece alight in the cities from which the global Burning Man culture has spread.